Thursday, 18 September 2014

The devil walks – by Anne Fine

“His tone changed. Thrusting his face at mine, he told me threateningly, ‘you’d best take care. More than one thing can sting under this roof.’”



The devil walks is a story set in the 19th century about a boy named Daniel Cunningham whose  name isn't really Cunningham. He is a blank page upon which anything might be written that has been hidden away from the outside world and told he suffers from a mysterious illness (even though he isn’t) by his mother who has stolen away his childhood he can not understand why until a forceful knock at the door reveals just how many secrets his silent and protective mother has kept from him and how many she’s told. Torn away from his home Daniel slowly piece’s together a chilling legacy of vicious cruelty and fiendish spite that has gripped his family for years 

by cam narre work experience 

Tuesday, 16 September 2014

Horns by Joe Hill

Horns by Joe Hill is an interesting book. It depicts the tale of Ig, a man who had just lost his girlfriend who was murdered. People suspect him for the crime and his life becomes a living hell. Ig wakes up one morning to find out he has grown demon horns. He finds out that the horns make others tell him their secrets. He can also control people based on what they have said to him. Ig then decides to use this ability to find out who murdered his girlfriend, and get revenge.

At first I read this very slowly, as I had other things going on but as soon as I found the time to read I was stuck into the book. At first I thought it was boring, with no development happening. I then read on and found it really interesting. Ig is an interesting character, a man who had lost everything he had loved and now cannot stop hearing people’s secrets. Ig is portrayed as kind of gloomy, always looking at the past with his girlfriend and trying to find out who had murdered her. Ig’s best friend Lee is portrayed as a shifty kind of character, always acting suspicious and doing suspicious things. Lee is by far the most interesting character in the book, with his lost eye and his shifty attitude.

The book also plays on a bit of religion, with Ig being more of a demon while Lee is more of an angel or god. The book also explains that Ig’s power cannot work on people wearing an holy item (e.g. a cross). This also pushes the religious aspect up. The book also has some parts played in a church, with the priests scared of Ig, as he has demon horns and demon powers. The religion that is displayed in the book however, is very limited, which is a very good thing.

In the end Horns is a very good book, depicting Ig’s journey to find his girlfriends killer. I would recommend this book to people who don’t mind reading something a bit adult, or are fans of things to do with demons and angels. The book is also getting a movie in the upcoming years, with it staring Daniel Radcliffe as Ig. I would recommend this book to those aged 15+

By Damon Slatter (Work experience student @ Endeavour Hills library)

Tuesday, 9 September 2014

The Minnow


The Minnow by Diana Sweeney is the winner of the Text Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing 2013.

I procrastinated for quite a while before I read this book. A pregnant teenager whose family had died in a flood? No thanks, I'll read something else.

But when I finally opened the book I couldn't put it down.
The cover is eye-catching - dark and beckoning - filled with sea creatures and underwater life. It also sets the mood for the novel.
And that is what I so loved about the book - a style and mood that sets it apart - dreamy and flowing.

The main character in the book is a girl called Tom who lives with a much older bloke called Bill since the death of her parents and sister.
Tom is pregnant with Bill's baby and she can no longer stay with Bill. She moves in with her friend Jonah who is helpful and supportive, as are others in her community.
As Tom works through her grief she communicates in an unlikely way with marine creatures and with her unborn child whom she names 'the minnow.'


This is a beautifully written novel that I recommend to those who love reading high quality YA fiction.

It is Diana's first novel, and it is a real winner.

-Ann

Friday, 5 September 2014

Heir of Fire

She is a Queen…
She is Aelin Ashryver Galathynius
Heir of two mighty bloodlines
And she’s back…


Celaena Sardothien can no longer run, no longer hide. Heartbroken, lost and sent to the other side of the world, home of her ancestors, Celaena will embark on a journey to fulfil the oath she made to her perished Celaena to finally face the past and herself. Learning to accept her Fae heritage and magic will only be the beginning of Celaena’s journey from infamous assassin to reigning Queen. However there is more to the King’s reign than Celaena could have ever imagined and defeat will come at a cost. The pieces are in play, moves are being made and war is about to rage. What will Celaena choose? Run or fight. There will be no second chances.
friend. However fulfilling such an oath will require

Heir of Fire is by far the best book of this series; everything finally comes together in this thrilling, edge of your seat read. The old of characters return; Celaena’s past finally comes to light giving the reader further insight into her actions thus far; Dorian continues to grow although as with the last book he doesn’t appear as much as I would like; Chaol continues to play his role of helper of all failing to demonstrate an ability to make decisions for himself and the King proves to be more cunning than first thought. There is also a host of new characters such as Manon, a witch who is quite unlikable, and despite thawing out during the book I struggled to make it through her chapters, Sorcha a healer who attracts Dorian’s attention but has secrets of her own, Aedion the traitorous cousin and Roland the mystery Fae who intrigues not only Celaena but the reader as well. Each new character brings a new depth to the older characters and the plot overall. The descriptive nature of the text is engaging and it was refreshing to alternate between the different perspectives of the characters, as it added more layers to the overall story. Again as with its predecessors I was enthralled with the world Maas has built and the supernatural aspects she has effortlessly woven in. The plot twists along with the host of new characters makes for compelling reading and revitalises the story in exciting, new and unexpected ways. This book is literally a page-turner; a stunning new sequel in what is fast becoming one of my favourite YA series.



Courtney :)

Friday, 29 August 2014

Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Claire


Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Claire is book one in the prequel series the Infernal Devices based before the Mortal Instruments series began. 

Magic is dangerous; but love is more dangerous still ~



When 16 year old Tessa Gray crosses the ocean to England in hope of finding her brother. The time is the reign of Queen Victoria and something terrifying is awaiting for her in the London’s downworld, where vampires, warlocks and other supernatural folk stalk the gas-lit streets. Only the Shadowhunters, Nephilim warriors dedicated to ridding the world of demons, in order to keep the peace among the human world. 
When she arrives in London, she is kidnapped by the mysterious Dark Sisters, who are members of a secret organisation called the Pandemonium Club; Tessa soon learns that she herself is a Downworlder with a rare ability. The ability to transform at will, into another person. The Magister, the shadowy figure that runs the Club, will stop at nothing to claim Tessa’s power for his own.
Tessa takes refuge with the Shadowhunters of the London Institute, who swear to find her brother if she will use her new found power to help them. She soon finds herself fascinated by and torn between two best friends; Jem, whose fragile beauty hides a deadly secret, and blue-eyed Will, whose caustic wit and volatile moods keep everyone in his life at arms length… everyone, that is, but Tessa. 
As their search draws them deep into the heart of an evil dark plot that threatens to destroy the Shadowhunters, Tessa realizes that she may need to choose between saving her brother and helping her new friends save the world... and that love may be the most dangerous magic of all.

This book is spectacular, with everything I'd wanted in the TMI series and more. The magic and mysteries are compelling and Victorian London is a fantastic backdrop to this steam-punk tale about a girl who discovers she has incredible powers...and an incredible past. Tessa is a vibrant, fascinating heroine and all the secondary characters, including Will and Jem and Charlotte, are engaging and sympathetic. I thought this book was much more mature than the TMI series, so I'm very much looking forward to reading the next two Infernal Devices instalments.




- S.Rose (Narre Work Experience Student)

Monday, 25 August 2014

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

 by Benjamin Alire Saenz has won a number of American awards and commendations including the Printz Honor Book, School Library Journal Best Book of the Year and Kirkus Reviews best Teen Book of the Year.

Fifteen year old Aristotle is not sure who he is. He has few if any friends. He does, however, enjoy bantering with his mother.

'What are you going to do today?' she asks him.
'I'm going to join a gang' he says.
'That's not funny' she responds.
'I'm Mexican. Isn't that what we do?'
'Not funny' she says.
'Not funny' agrees Aristotle.


Whilst Aristotle is at the local pool, he befriends a teenage boy called Dante and they form an intense bond.
Over time, Dante, an artistic teenager, is able to break down barriers that Aristotle has built around himself.

The reader slowly discovers that Dante is gay. What happens next is a journey for both young men that involves inner strength and bravery.

There are many things to admire about this novel and the relationship that both boys have with their parents is one factor.
The writing is clever and honest, depicting the lives and challenges of American/Mexican families.

Highly recommended reading.

-Ann

Saturday, 23 August 2014

Wonder by R.J Palacio





Wonder by R.J Palacio
I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a severe facial deformity and this book follows his story as he attends mainstream school for the first time. The story is told from the point of view of Auggie, as well as the people in his life. Being the 'new kid' at any school is always hard, Auggie must learn to make new friends, interact with teachers and navigate new rules. Auggie has to deal with all of the usual emotions on top of his fears about how people will react when they see his face.

We, the reader, are never offered a detailed description of Auggie's face, but as the story goes on and we hear from other characters, we begin to create a picture of what we think Auggie must look like. What I found most striking about this novel was that sometimes, because Auggie's voice sounds like the voice of any regular 5th grader, I would sometimes forget about his deformity and get sucked in to the relationships and conflicts in the story.

August's down to earth attitude and bravery is inspiring. This particular quote is an example of his perspective on things:

It’s okay, I know I’m weird-looking, take a look, I don’t bite. Hey, the truth is, if a wookie started going to school all of a sudden, I’d be curious, I’d probably stare a bit! And if I was walking with Jack or Summer, I’d probably whisper to them: Hey, there’s the wookie. And if the wookie caught me saying that, he’d know I wasn’t trying to be mean. I was just pointing out the fact that he’s a wookie.

Despite Auggie's attitude and resilience, there are some awful scenes which make the book an emotional and heart breaking read. However, these scenes are balanced by moments of inspiring kindness and friendship that leave you feeling whimsical and uplifted. Ultimately positive, this book was a compassionate story, realistic and warm. I would recommend it for readers of all ages.

Jess from Endeavour Hills

 
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